Here’s the reason Ricky Martin waited years before coming out as gay

“A lot of people told me my feelings were evil.”

Ricky Martin has opened up about his decision to come out during an intimate interview with CBS.

The latin-pop superstar came out in 2010, and posted a heartfelt message on his official website: “I am proud to say that I am a fortunate homosexual man. I am very blessed to be who I am.”

He said the birth of his twin sons Matteo and Valentino were the deciding factor in his decision: “If I’m not honest with my kids, what am I teaching them? I’m teaching them to lie.”

Ricky revealed, “I struggled so much. It was extremely painful. And when I finally sent that tweet and I shared with the world my sexual orientation, I was like, ‘Oh my God, this is it?’ Perfect. Perfection.”

When asked why he didn’t come out sooner, Ricky said, “I was afraid of rejection” and “a lot of people told me that my feelings were evil.” People around Ricky also told him, “‘what you’re feeling is not godly'”, which caused him to believe he wasn’t a good person.

Ricky told CBS that he finally had enough: “Not more of that. I’m a good person. And there’s absolutely nothing wrong with me. No. No. Enough. Not more of that.”

Since coming out, Ricky said he’s been “the happiest man ever since”, and “the decisions I make today, even for my career, are for the well-being of my children.”

Related: Ricky Martin has joined the cast of Versace: American Crime Story. 

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