Thousands call for equality during Hong Kong Pride parade

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Thousands of people attended Hong Kong’s LGBT Pride parade over the weekend.

The annual event, which brings together LGBT+ people and allies from across the city, saw almost 7,000 people march for equality in the rain, including Hong Kong’s first openly gay lawmaker Ray Chan.

He told AFP: “After decades, we still do not have anti-discrimination laws and marriage equality is still far away.”

Ray claimed that many of his friends who work in government or as teachers find it difficult to reveal their sexual orientation, adding: “I hope that one day with our hard work, they can openly attend pride parade.”

While homosexuality is legal in Hong Kong, same-sex marriage and civil unions are not recognised.

Steve Imrie, a headmaster in neighbouring Guangzhou, said: “Hong Kong should be much more forward-thinking than the rest of the country, so we are looking for Hong Kong to be allowing same-sex marriage, and China should follow it, hopefully.”

Earlier this month, one of Asia’s most progressive societies, Taiwan, saw a reported 80,000 attend its annual Pride parade, with campaigners using the opportunity to call for the legalisation of same-sex marriage.

Check out photos from the 2016 Hong Kong Pride parade below.

Can't rain on our parade????

A photo posted by Meghan Bing (@m.bingaling) on

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